Operation | Yamaha Outboards

Questions

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FOR FAST ANSWERS TO SOME OF YOUR YAMAHA QUESTIONS.

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From dealership and warranty information to picking a prop and finding a part number, we have answers to many of the questions you may have, right here. If you don’t find your Q & A here, contact the nearest Yamaha marine dealer or call Yamaha Customer Service at (866) 894-1626.

Use the dropdown menu to select your topic of interest. All related questions will be listed below. 

Operation

Can I use the Tilt Support Lever for transporting my Yamaha outboard?

No. The Tilt Support Lever is to be used only for storage purposes. The Tilt Support Lever was not designed to withstand the strain of transport and could break causing damage to the Tilt Support Lever and/or other bracket components. Yamaha now offers an accessory for transporting called “Outboard Trailering Support.” Learn more about the Outboard Trailering Support, as it is not designed to be used with every model. There are also many aftermarket companies that provide “wedges” or “transom savers” that can offer a solution for your transportation needs. Please make sure that whatever aftermarket component you use is designed to work specifically with your model Yamaha outboard. You can review “Storage and Transportation” instruction in your Owner’s Manual. You can find this information in the Maintenance section.

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Does my Yamaha engine have an Over Revolution Protection system?

Most Yamaha outboards have over revolution protection. This system assists your outboard from operating beyond its normal Wide-Open-Throttle rpm. Once the Over Revolution Protection system is initiated, it will cut ignition to certain cylinders on your engine to try to slow the engine down to within its correct operating range. Current year models that do not have this system would be four-stroke engines with 2.5 & 4 horsepower. In addition, two-stroke engines between 8-15 horsepower do not include this system. If you would like to know if this system is included with an older model, please contact your local Yamaha dealership. Otherwise, you can contact Yamaha Outboard Customer Relations at (866) 894-1626.

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How do I stop the maintenance warning on my Command Link® Tachometer? (Video)

Put the tachometer into its custom mode as follows: Put the engine key switch in the off position. Turn the switch to key-on power (do not start the engine). Hold down the “Mode” button for 4 seconds. This will get you into the custom mode.

Continue for Square Gauges: There are 5 choices in this mode. Maintenance is the first one. Select it by pushing the “Set” button. The maintenance hours should now be blinking. Push and hold the “Set” and “Mode” buttons simultaneously until you see the hours reset to zero (1 to 2 seconds). You have now reset the maintenance counter. Pushing the “Set” button will get you back to the normal menu.

Continue for Round Gauges: There are 3 choices in this mode. Maintenance is the first one. The maintenance hours should now be blinking. Simultaneously push down the “Set” and “Mode” buttons until you see the reset to zero (1 to 2 seconds). You have now reset the maintenance counter. Pushing the “Set” button will take you back to the normal menu.

These steps can be found on page 12 of the operational manual for either gauge. If you are missing a copy, you can download one here.

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How should I start my Yamaha Outboard if it has “Prime Start”?

Prime Start provides an automatic choke-less operation in all climates for turn-the-key satisfaction on models without fuel injection. Simply start the motor; Prime Start will help ensure proper warm-up enrichment. You do not need to use the warm-up lever with Prime Start. The warm-up lever was designed for carburetors with a manual choke system.

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How should I transport my Yamaha outboard motor?

Proper transportation is important, because an improper transport can cause damage to your outboard, or boat or trailer, and, more seriously, could lead to personal injury. Check your Owner’s Manual carefully for instructions, as the procedures vary from model to model. Yamaha now offers an accessory for transporting called “Outboard Trailering Support.” Learn more about the Outboard Trailering Support, as it is not designed to be used with every model. You may visit the Parts & Service section to view owner's manuals for 1998 and newer outboard motors or you can order your manual online.

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I don’t see water coming out of the overboard indicator when flushing. Is that a problem?

The overboard indicator is for visual verification of water pressure under normal operation. If you are using the convenient flushing attachment feature without running the engine, it is not a problem. However, if you are running the engine while flushing using a flushing attachment like muffs, stop the engine if you do not see water coming out – the engine is not getting adequate water pressure for proper cooling. Correct the problem before continuing to avoid the possibility of serious engine damage.

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I have a two-stroke pre-mix engine (adding oil to the fuel manually) and want to know what the oil ratio of 50:1 or 100:1 is.

For a 50:1 pre-mix, multiply your gallons of fuel to be used by 2.6. This will give you the amount of ounces needed for this pre-mix ratio. For example, I have a 3-gallon fuel tank. 3 X 2.6 = 7.8 ounces. For 100:1, your multiplier will be 1.3. So if you have a 3-gallon fuel tank, it would be: 3 X 1.3 = 3.9 ounces. Note: When pre-mixing, know that it does not have to be exact and you can round up as needed.

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May I start the engine out of water?

Never start your engine out of water unless you are using an external lower-unit flushing adapter, commonly known as “ear muffs” designed for your type of outboard motor (not the integral Freshwater Flush Adapter found on some engines) to provide cooling water from a garden hose. Otherwise, you could damage or seize the engine. Operate at no more than an advanced idle with good water pressure. Never put the engine in gear; only use the warm-up lever to advance the throttle. Never leave an engine running on a flush attachment unattended.

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What does RPM reduction mean?

RPM reduction is a mode within the engine warning system. RPM reduction is when the engine forces a reduction of rpm during operation. This can be caused by a couple of reasons: an overheating of the engine or the oil system has a loss of oil pressure (four-stroke models) or low oil level (two-stroke models). RPM reduction is used as a safety measure to try and protect the engine but also to continue to provide mobility in case it is needed. Your RPM will be gradually reduced down to approximately 2000 rpms. The engine should run fine below 2000 rpms but will run very rough if you try to accelerate beyond 2000 rpms. Smaller horsepower engines, like an F2.5 or F4, may not come with a warning system, or have limited warning system protection. Ask your Yamaha dealership or Yamaha Outboard Customer Relations, at (866) 894-1626, for more details as needed.

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What does the warning buzzer mean?

You should read your Owner’s Manual before you operate your outboard. It will explain various warnings you might encounter during operation. In most cases, one of your gauges will indicate why a buzzer has come on. If the buzzer is indicating a problem with oil or overheating, it will also be accompanied by a reduction in maximum rpm. If the buzzer comes on when you start the engine and then goes off, this may indicate water in the fuel/ water separator. It may also be a normal operation check on a twin-engine boat using Genuine PowerMatched™ rigging components. If you are unable to determine what the buzzer means you should check with your authorized Yamaha dealer before continued operation. Conditions like low oil and overheating can seriously damage your engine. Consult your dealer as soon as possible.

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What engine models can take advantage of the variable trolling feature that provides precise and consistent trolling speeds on Command Link® tachometers or the Multifunction Tiller Handle?

The variable trolling feature allows you to adjust your RPM in 50-rpm increments through a specific RPM range. Review the models below that support this exciting new feature: • F50, T50, F60 and T60 models manufactured 04/2004 or newer range between 620~900 rpms • F75 & F90 models manufactured 04/2004 or newer have range of 550~1000 rpms • All F300 and F350 have a range of 600~1000 rpms • The new EFI F40 ranges from 650~900 rpms • The new Digital Electronic Controlled F250 has a range of 600~1000 rpms

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What is the break-in period for my new four-stroke Yamaha Outboard?

New engines require a period of break-in to allow the mating surfaces of moving parts to mate evenly. Correct break-in, as described in your Owner’s Manual, will help your outboard provide proper performance and longer engine life. Yamaha’s four-stroke engines have a 10-hour break-in period as follows:

FOUR STROKE OUTBOARDS
IntervalProcedure
1st HourOperate the engine at varying speeds up to 2000 rpms or approximately 1/2 throttle.
2nd HourIncrease the engine speed until the boat is on plane (but avoid full throttle operaton) and then back off on the throttle while keeping the boat at a planing speed.
Next 8 HoursRun the engine at any speed however avoid operating at full throttle for more than 5 minutes at a time.
After the 1st 10 HoursOperate the engine normally.

 

 The break-in maintenance is at 20 hours. For the 10 hours after the break-in and before the service you can operate the engine normally.

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What is the break-in period for my two-stroke Yamaha Outboard?

New engines require a period of break-in to allow the mating surfaces of moving parts to mate evenly. Correct break-in, as described in your Owner’s Manual’s “Operation” chapter, will help your outboard provide proper performance and longer engine life. Yamaha’s two-stroke outboards have a 10-hour break-in. All carbureted (non-HPDI) engines require a 50:1 gas to oil ratio during the ten hour break-in period. The break-in steps are as follows:

 

TWO STROKE OUTBOARDS
IntervalProcedure
1st 10 MinutesRun the engine at the lowest possible speed (idle). A fast in-gear idle is best.
Next 50 MinutesDo not exceed half throttle (approximately 3000 rpms). Vary engine speed occasionally. If you have an easy planing boat, accelerate at full throttle onto plane, then immediately reduce throttle to 3000 rpms or less.
Next 2 HoursAccelerate at full throttle onto plane, then reduce engine speed to 3/4 throttle (approximately 4000 rpms). Vary engine speed occasionally. Run at full throttle for 1 minute, then allow 10 minutes of operation at 3/4 throttle or less.
Next 7 HoursRun the engine at any speed however avoid operating at full throttle for more than 5 minutes at a time.
After the 1st 10 HoursOperate the engine normally.

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What is the minimum water pressure required for my Yamaha outboard(s)?

All Yamaha outboards have a minimum water pressure of eleven (11) psi at Wide Open Throttle (WOT). There are no announced water pressure specs for low or mid-range operation at this time. This is due to our high volume low pressure cooling system design. In fact, you may see zero pressure at idle, as most water pressure sensors start working at 3-psi.

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What wide-open-throttle (W.O.T.) rpm should my engine be turning?

The W.O.T. RPM range varies from model-to-model. Find operating-range information in the “Maintenance” chapter of your owner’s manual under “Specification Data.” You may visit the Parts & Service section to view owner's manuals for 1998 and newer outboard motors or you can order your manual online.

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When I reduce my throttle from cruising to trolling with my four-stroke engine, oil pressure drops on my Command Link® gauge and then rises again after about 10 to 30 seconds. Is that normal?

This temporary drop is normal. Here is why: When running at higher speeds, oil becomes hot, thinning the viscosity of the oil. So when the engine is reduced to lower rpm operation, it takes a little bit of time for the oil to cool down and become thicker, which will allow oil pressure to rise again. This temporary drop in pressure indicated on your gauge does not harm your four-stroke engine. If you have a drop in oil pressure that does fall outside the parameters of normal operation, your engine has an alarm system that will sound a horn, display a warning on your Command Link® tachometer gauge, and reduce maximum engine speed to 2000 rpm.

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